Home
Documents
CCL

COMBAT OBJECTIVES AND TACTICS

SYNOPSIS - The OSI/CACD System 2 offers many different simulation possibilities. Each variation presents it own strategic options and subtleties.
  • SECTION 1 - MELEE 1
    • 1.1 MELEE OBJECTIVE 1
    • 1.2 MELEE TACTICS 1
      • 1.2.1 Destroying the Other Cybertanks 1
      • 1.2.2 Hiding From the Other Cybertanks 2
  • SECTION 2 - TEAM COMBAT 2
    • 2.1 ABSOLUTE TERMINATION 2
    • 2.2 HEADQUARTERS TERMINATION 2
    • 2.3 Team Communications 3
  • SECTION 3 - MANUAL CONTROL 3
    • 3.1 WHAT IS MANUAL CONTROL? 3
    • 3.2 HOW TO ACHIEVE MANUAL CONTROL 3

SECTION 1 - MELEE

SECTION BRIEF - The most common type of simulation is known as Melee. Melee is an all out free-for-all. Each cybertank in a melee simulation is an enemy Of every other cybertank.

1.1 MELEE OBJECTIVE

The only objective during a melee simulation is to be the last active cybertank left on the battlefield. This objective can be attained through a number of strategic possibilities.

1.2 MELEE TACTICS

1.2.1 Destroying the Other Cybertanks

The most common method of being victorious in a melee simulation is to destroy all the other cybertanks in the simulation. If there are meny other cybertanks in the melee, then a cybertank must be very powerful if it is to have a chance at being victorious. The chances of encountering two or more enemy cybertanks at the same time is relatively high; thus, a cybertank in a large melee must be able to sustain damage “from behind” while attacking another enemy.
During a small, or one-on-one melee, the victory does not necessarily go to the most powerful cybertank, but to the cybertank witli the “cleverest” AI design. For example, a small, quick cybertank can move in on a larger, more powerful tank and get off a couple of shots before the larger tank is able to react. If this process is successfully.repeated, then any cybertank can “wear down” a much larger, more powerful tank.

1.2.2 Hiding From the Other Cybertanks

The other commonly used tactic in winning a melee simulation is that of hiding from the other cybertanks. While this method is less exciting, it still produces a large number of victories. The cgbertank that attempts to hide usually moves to the closest corner and sits there. By hiding in the corner, a cybertank is protected from assaults from behind by the battlefield wall. A cybertank hiding in the corner is less likely to be detected by other cybertanks, and while hiding, the other cybertanks are roaming around the battlefield, destroying each other. The other cybertanks are using a great deal of fuel moving around the battlefield, while the cybertank in the corner is stationary and conserves fuel.

SECTION 2 - TEAM COMBAT

SECTION BRIEF - Cybertanks can also engage in team combat simulation. Team combat pits groups of cybertanks, composed of up to seven cybertanks, against one another. Team combat offers many strategic possibilities.

2.1 ABSOLUTE TERMINATION

As in a melee simulation, a team of cybertanks can be victorious by destroying all of the cybertanks on the opposing team [see Part 2, Section 3 for more information on the Simulation Design Module (SDM) and setting up cybertank teams]. With up to seven cybertanks per team, this can prove to be a very difficult task. To be effective, a team of cybertanks should employ the use of a Commlink (see Section 2.3 for more information regarding the Commlink). By using the Commlink effectively, a team of cybertanks can pool their resources and information. For example, cybertanks on the same team can come to the rescue of a team-member who is being attacked. It should be noted that any cybertanks In the simulation that have NOT been placed on a team are treated as If they were In a melee simulation (ie., all other cybertanks are the enemy).

2.2 HEADQUARTERS TERMINATION

The Simulation Design Module (SDM) allows a headquarters building to be placed on the battlefield for each of the two teams. A team that destroys an enemy’s headquarters is the victor in team combat.
When a team combat simulation includes headquarter buildings, the strategic options increase. Since a headquarters is easy to destroy, it must be well protected. lt is very effective to divide the offensive and defensive duties of the cybertanks on a team. The offensive tanks should be very good “search’ tanks, possessing good scanners and able to cover a great deal of the battlefield as quickly as possible while searching for the enemy headquarters. The defensive tanks should be very powerful tanks. The defensive tanks will not have to move very much, and do not need to be fast or fuel efficient; however, they should be equipped with the best weapons and armor possible. Defensive tanks should also have good scanners so they can detect incoming enemy tanks as soon as possible.
The Commlink Is an important part of the strategy In team combat that incorporates a design with a headquarters. Once the enemy headquarters is found by a cybertank, its position can be relayed to all members of the team. By doing so, all firepower can be concentrated in the area of the enemy headquarters.

2.3 Team Communications

The cybertank Communications Link (Commlink), a special device,, which can be purchased in the Chassis Design Module (CDM), enables communication between cybertanks on the same team. When using cybertanks in the Team mode, it is often useful to transmit various data or instructions to other members of the team. Effective use of the Commlink aids in the performance of complicated tactical maneuvers by a team of cybertanks. By transmitting various codes, a team of cybertanks can consolidate its forces and knowledge, forming a colossal army. For complete information on the usage of the CommLink, please see Part 3. Section 6.

SECTION 3 - MANUAL CONTROL

SECTION BRIEF - One of the most interesting simulation possibilities is that of manually controlled cybertanks. By pressing various keys on the computer terminal, a cybertank designer can exercise a great deal of control over the cybertank.

3.1 WHAT IS MANUAL CONTROL?

All cybertanks are equipped with what Is known as a Cybertank Remote System (CRS). The CRS is basically a link between your terminal’s keyboard and your cybertank. By issuing single letter commands [A-Z] from your terminal’s keyboard during simulations, you can greatly alter the behavior of your cybertank.
Cybertanks that rely on the CRS to respond to keyboard control are often called Manual cybertanks. Manual cybertanks have a tremendous advantage over standard AI cybertanks because the cybertank benefits from the designer’s logic and reasoning capabilities during a simulation. When designing Manual cybertanks, complex routines to move around indestructible buildings, avoid water, or retreat from the enemy are unnecessary. Such routines can be handled by the cybertank designer during the simulation.

3.2 HOW TO ACHIEVE MANUAL CONTROL

Attaining manual Control is a rather simple process. In the following example, the CCL code continually checks to see if the last key pressed is an “I”, "K", “K”, “M”, or ” ” (space). If the last key pressed is one of these keys, the on-board computer system will branch to the appropriate label. After the cybertank turns or moves forward, the on-board computer system branches back to the ReadKey label and the process is repeated.
ReadKey
   If Last Key Pressed = "I" then Branch to TurnNorth
   If Last Key Pressed = "J" then Branch to TurnWest
   If Last Kev Pressed = "M" then Branch to TurnSouth
   If Last Key Pressed = "K" then Branch to TurnEast
   If Last Key Pressed = " " then Branch to MoveForward
   Branch to ReadKey
TurnNorth
Turn Tank to 0
Branch to ReadKey
TurnWest
Turn Tank to 6
Branch to ReadKey
TurnSouth
Turn Tank to 4
Branch to ReadKey
TurnEast
Turn Tank to 2
Branch to ReadKey
MoveForwd
Move Tank Forward 1
Branch to ReadKey
By using the above CCL, you con completely control the movement of your cybertank. If you want your cybertank to turn to the west, move forward one hectometer. And then turn to the south, you would press "J", " ", “M”.
For a complete discussion of Manual cybertanks please see Part 3, Section 5.7).

Toadstool's Home | Contact © 2003 Toadstool's Game Shrines. All Rights Reserved.